Ocean freight shipping to Shanghai

Shanghai is a huge motor in the economic powerhouse that is China. Located in the Yangtze River Delta in east China, Shanghai is located near the mouth of the Yangtze near the middle of the Chinese coast. It is the world’s largest city in terms of population, and the home of the world’s busiest container port. If you’re an exporter, ocean freight to Shanghai should be an essential building block of your business.

As well as being one of China’s main industrial centers, Shanghai is also the commercial and financial center of the country. It has been one of the fastest-developing cities in the world over the last twenty years. Shanghai is home to mainland China’s largest free-trade zone, known as the China (Shanghai) Pilot Free-Trade Zone. The city has recorded double-digit growth almost every year since 1992. With Shanghai’s profile and location being what they are, exporters can’t afford to ignore the benefits of ocean freight to Shanghai.

FCL or LCL for your ocean freight to Shanghai

When you are shipping a container to Shanghai, will you need a full container load (FCL) or a shared container-(LCL, a less-than-container load)? That’s first question you’ll need to address.

A full container load (FCL) is indicated if your shipment is equal to six or more standard pallets-a little more than half the capacity of a 20-foot container, which can take ten standard pallets. A 40-foot container can accommodate up to 22 standard pallets.

If you have any concerns about your goods coming into contact with those of other exporters, you should also choose FCL.

Groupage-a shared container (also known as a less-than-container load, or LCL)-is, otherwise, a good choice, and a cost-efficient one; with this arrangement, you pay only for the shipping space you need. Visit iContainers for information on rates and other important details.

Ocean freight routes to Shanghai

Port of Shanghai

The port of Shanghai faces the East China Sea to the east, and Hangzhou Bay to the south. It is comprised of three individual ports-Wusongkuo, Waigaoqiao, and Yangshan deep-water port. It is managed by the Shanghai International Port Group. Shanghai overtook Singapore to become the world’s busiest container port in 2010, and in 2014, it handled over 35 million TEUs, setting a record. There are numerous terminals here to serve commercial needs, including the Coal Branch (handling carbon, sand, and gravel); the Baoshan Terminal Branch (handling bulk and general cargo); and the Zhanghuabang Company (handling iron and steel, containers, and heavy cargo). The port of Shanghai is the gateway to Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Henan provinces, all of which have dense populations, strong industrial bases, and developed agricultural sectors.